University of Hawaiʻi System News https://www.hawaii.edu/news News from the University of Hawaii Fri, 02 Apr 2021 01:53:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-UHNews512-1-32x32.jpg University of Hawaiʻi System News https://www.hawaii.edu/news 32 32 Spotlight on anti-Asian racism part of UH speaker series https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/04/01/spotlight-on-anti-asian-racism-series/ Fri, 02 Apr 2021 01:53:28 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138458 Activist Helen Zia to speak at the University of Hawaiʻi series.

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headshot
Helen Zia

As fears build following a stark rise in anti-Asian attacks largely targeting senior citizens, many are wondering what they can do to stamp out the violence. The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Better Tomorrow Speaker Series will host a live online conversation with author and activist Helen Zia, one of the country’s most prominent Asian-American voices against hate and homophobia.

The livestream conversation, “The Long Road to Atlanta: Anti-Asian Racism and Misogyny,” will be held on Monday, April 12, at 4 p.m.

“The University of Hawaiʻi is deeply troubled by recent acts of violence and discrimination,” said UH President David Lassner. “We look forward to this conversation with Helen Zia as we come together to condemn racism, xenophobia and misogyny, and we try to lift each other up and create a kind and caring UH community.”

“As an unwavering voice for social justice, Helen Zia will help us reckon with racial and sexual violence in America’s past and present,” said Mari Yoshihara, scholar of Asian American history and UH Mānoa American studies department chair.

The event is open to the public. (Submit questions and register here.)

Former UH Mānoa American Studies Professor Theodore S. Gonzalves, past president of the Association for Asian American Studies, will interview Zia and field questions from the audience.

More on Zia

Zia, a daughter of immigrants from China, authored Last Boat out of Shanghai, My Country Versus Me and Asian American Dreams. She gained prominence in the 1980s as the national organizer and spokesperson for the Justice for Vincent Chin campaign, a story currently under development as a television series. Zia writes regularly for the New York Times, Washington Post.

The Better Tomorrow Speaker Series is a joint venture of the Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, Kamehameha Schools and UH.

Lead sponsors of this event include the American Civil Liberties Union of Hawaiʻi; Association for Asian American Studies; UH Mānoa College of Arts, Languages, and Letters; College of Social Sciences; Department of History and the William S. Richardson School of Law. Co-sponsors include the UH Mānoa Departments of American studies, anthropology, English, ethnic studies, political science and women’s studies, as well as the Matsunaga Institute for Peace.

For more on information, visit the UH Better Tomorrow Speaker Series website or email btss@hawaii.edu.

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UH health clinic rising to pandemic challenge, expands role https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/04/01/uh-health-clinic-expands-role/ Thu, 01 Apr 2021 22:57:13 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138402 UHSM helped establish the COVID-19 prevention guidelines, and offered COVID-19 resource and support services to the Mānoa campus.

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university health services staff
University Health Services Mānoa’s COVID-19 Response Team

When the COVID-19 pandemic severely disrupted University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa operations in March 2020, the University Health Services Manoa (UHSM) became a leader in the campus response to the health crisis. Since its opening in 1932, the campus clinic has served primarily students by offering a wide range of health services and programs. In response to COVID-19, UHSM was part of the team that established the COVID-19 prevention guidelines adopted across the 10-campus system while also offering COVID-19 resource and support services to the Mānoa campus.

“The hardworking and dedicated team at University Health Services has been crucial to Mānoa’s response to the pandemic and to minimize the spread of the virus on campus,” said UH Mānoa Provost Michael Bruno.

andy nichols
Andrew Nichols

From the beginning of the pandemic, the clinic never closed as it quickly adapted to add telehealth services to continue to provide medical care to the UH Mānoa community.

“We expanded our role to keep our patients and campus community healthy and safe,” said UHSM Director Andrew Nichols. “We worked closely with the Hawaiʻi Department of Health (DOH) and met frequently with campus leaders and the Mānoa COVID-19 Health & Well-Being Group to quickly develop and implement a campus response plan.”

Mary G. Boland, dean of the School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, is co-lead of the Health & Well-Being Group, and worked with Nichols and the UHSM team to put together Mānoaʻs COVID-19 response plan.

UHSM has been a key player from the very beginning of this pandemic,” said Boland. “Serving as the designated point of contact for all COVID-19 health matters is a huge undertaking. They have done it well, all while taking care of other health matters from our campus community.”

Managing COVID-19 on campus

contact tracing illustration

UHSM is responsible for testing, contact tracing and telehealth monitoring of all positive cases reported on the UH Mānoa campus. The COVID-19 Response Team supports diagnosed or exposed individuals and monitors them daily through their isolation/quarantine period. They provide care instructions, advise when to seek medical attention and determine when individuals can return to work or class. They also identify close contacts and provide those individuals with support.

The health clinic is in regular communication with DOH and coordinates with multiple campus units including student housing, athletics, facilities and communications on numerous efforts including accommodating student residents who test positive, identifying rooms and buildings that have been exposed and the timely announcement of positive cases.

COVID-19 forced us all to make changes faster than were going to occur naturally. —Nichols

“Our team is committed to provide a rapid response to manage our campus cases. Our focus is on identifying and minimizing the spread of COVID-19 on campus,” said Nichols.

In the spring 2021 semester, UHSM started surveillance testing of student housing residents and staff. About 5% of the student resident population and 10% of the staff are tested each week for about 50 tests a week.

“Our point is to identify asymptomatic carriers of the virus,” said Nichols. “The results indicate a very low prevalence on campus, at least so far.”

Students and employees take the self-administered swab tests on a covered lanai outside the UHSM building on East-West Road. Couriers pick up the test specimens the same afternoon the tests are administered and the results come back in less than 48 hours.

A shift to telehealth

laptop with stethoscope

Prior to COVID-19, UHSM was predominantly a walk-in clinic that averaged 16,000 visits per year and only 25% were scheduled appointments. Patients now are seen by appointment only and telehealth sessions are offered.

“With so many students in the residence halls, so close to campus, we didn’t know how much need there was, but with telehealth, we’ve had 600 telehealth visits in the first 10 months,” said Nichols. A portion of these sessions also included faculty and staff.

The clinic reduced operating hours in the initial months of COVID-19, but have since resumed normal business hours and have also started to accept a limited number of walk-in patients.

In addition, an after-hours phone line is available for those seeking to speak to a healthcare professional outside of the clinic’s normal operating hours by dialing the main office number (808) 956-8965.

“We made a remarkable shift. COVID-19 forced us all to make changes faster than were going to occur naturally,” said Nichols who also praised the collaboration among the many UH Mānoa units that had little interaction before the pandemic. “When we put our combined efforts together and enlist the expertise of many persons, it’s amazing what we can accomplish in such a short period of time.”

Nichols is hopeful that UHSM can begin to administer the COVID-19 vaccine, similar to how the clinic provides the flu and other vaccines. “The Get Vaccinated UH campaign is helping to get to the critical mass, our students. We’ll be better off once we get to herd immunity. However, it’s also important to realize with vaccines there won’t be any significant relaxation of mitigation measures for some time. Physical distancing and masks will not be going away anytime soon.”

Contact the clinic

Visit the UHSM website to learn more about their services or call (808) 956-8965.

COVID-19 related questions can be emailed to uhsm.covid@hawaii.edu.

university health services building
University Health Services Mānoa has been at its present location on East-West Road since 1964.
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Play along with Natalie Ai Kamauu, kanikapila style https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/04/01/kani-na-pua-koolau-kamauu/ Thu, 01 Apr 2021 20:13:59 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138422 Share an evening with Natalie Ai Kamauu, in the workshop Kani Nā Pua Koʻolau hosted by Windward Community College

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Share an evening with one of Hawaiʻi’s premier female vocalists and hula dancers, Natalie Ai Kamauu, in the workshop Kani Nā Pua Koʻolau hosted by Windward Community College Music Instructor Kamuela Kimokeo. Play along with your instrument in a laid-back, kanikapila style, while also having the opportunity to hear experiences and manaʻo (thoughts) from the artist and her musician husband Iolani Kamauu.

This noncredit workshop will be offered online via Zoom and includes access to downloadable sheet music and video song recordings to practice at home with Kamauu.

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Kamuela Kimokeo

Event details

The workshop will be held on Thursday, April 8, 5:30–7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.

Register and pay for the event online. Participants will receive the Zoom login I.D. and access to downloadable sheet music and video recordings a few days prior to the workshop.

For assistance, call (808) 235-7433 or email wccocet@hawaii.edu.

Required technology

  • Computer, tablet (such as an iPad or Samsung Galaxy tablet) or smartphone
  • Access to high-speed internet (minimum 512K)
  • A device with camera, microphone and speaker
  • Access to Zoom (Zoom quick start guide for new users)

For more information, contact Kamuela Kimokeo at (808) 236-9131 or email kamuelam@hawaii.edu.

Kamuela Kimokeo poster

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April 2021 anniversaries https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/04/01/april-2021-anniversaries/ Thu, 01 Apr 2021 18:00:12 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138355 The University of Hawaiʻi celebrates April 2021 faculty and staff anniversaries.

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Congratulations, and purple flowers

The University of Hawaiʻi celebrates April 2021 faculty and staff anniversaries.

30 Years

Aragon-Balgas, Beatriz
Office Assistant, UH Mānoa

Amore, Teresita D
Assistant Researcher, UH Mānoa

Baker Ladao, Narleen K
Research Support, UH Mānoa

More anniversaries
January 2021
February 2021
March 2021

Chee, Clayton K T
Media Design and Production, UH Mānoa

Domingo, Lucena G
Janitor, UH Mānoa

Hane, Dana Mariko
Institutional Support, UH System

Gumayagay, Delia D
Janitor, UH Mānoa

Mercado, Richard J
Agricultural Research Technician, UH Mānoa

Okikawa, Noreen Reiko
Instructional and Student Support, UH Mānoa

Tomori, Jeffrey K
Institutional Support, UH System

Tanigawa, Kent K
Media Design and Production, Kauaʻi CC

20 Years

Barruga, Camden A
Media Design and Production, Leeward CC

Fujitani, Earl
Agricultural Research Technician, UH Mānoa

Murata, Vivian N
Instructional and Student Support, UH Mānoa

Miyata, Sandra S
Institutional Support, UH Mānoa

Ticktin, Tamara Beth
Professor, UH Mānoa

10 Years

Chung, Aimee B
Junior Specialist, UH Mānoa

Debruyne, Kristen S
Academic Support, UH West Oʻahu

Fujino, Kelly
Instructional and Student Support, UH West Oʻahu

Fukuda, Lane M
IT Specialist, UH System

Friedman, Brendon M
Assistant Professor, UH Mānoa

Komatsu, Jenna Naomi
Academic Support, UH Mānoa

Kleiber, Eleanor J
Librarian, UH Mānoa

Lake, Margaret R
Assistant Professor, Kauaʻi CC

Melton, Maureen
Information, Events and Publications, UH Mānoa

Ndhlovu, Lishomwa
Professor, UH Mānoa

Rosen, Princess Rose
Libraria, UH Mānoa

Schanzenbach, David L
Information Technology, UH System

Silva, Julie
Instructional and Student Support, UH Mānoa

Yamashita, Robert T J
Instructional and Student Support, Windward CC

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More time to apply! UH Mānoa application deadline extended through July https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/03/31/manoa-application-deadline-extended/ Wed, 31 Mar 2021 20:00:40 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138327 To prepare for fall 2021, prospective students can view a series of New Rainbow Warrior webinars.

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students

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa is extending the deadline for prospective students to apply, providing more time to consider attending one of the best universities in the world without leaving Hawaiʻi or going into major debt. UH Mānoa is consistently ranked in the top 2% of the best national and international universities and a number of graduate programs were ranked among the best in the nation this week by U.S. News and World Report. UH Mānoa is also a tremendous value, with affordable in-state tuition and millions of dollars available in financial aid.

Prospective students are encouraged to apply now through July 31. Applicants should go to TakeMeToManoa.org for more information and to apply for the upcoming academic year and start their college journey in the fall 2021 semester. Those who may need student housing and financial assistance are encouraged to start the application processes as soon as possible, as awards are made on a first come, first served basis.

“Barring any unforeseen setbacks, the upcoming academic year will see the reopening of our beautiful campus and its amenities,” said UH Mānoa Provost Michael Bruno in a March 29 message to the campus community. “This upcoming fall 2021 semester will be a transition semester, as we navigate from a primarily online environment towards a primarily in-person semester by spring 2022. We believe our approach will ensure that our students will learn in a safe, flexible and stimulating environment, inspired and informed by the world-class research, scholarship and creative work of our faculty and reinforced by stellar support services.”

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To prepare for fall 2021, prospective students can view a series of New Rainbow Warrior webinars and plan to attend the New Student Orientation, scheduled from July 19 to August 2, providing students and their ʻohana all the necessary resources, tools and skills to be successful at UH Mānoa.

The expectation is that there will be plenty of activity on campus when the semester begins as UH Mānoa has seen a surge in enrollment that started before the pandemic. More than 120 student clubs and organizations can start meeting in person again, and research opportunities for undergraduate students will continue. The UH football team will play its home games on campus for the very first time, in addition to the usual athletic events, performances and campus events.

Graduate application deadlines for UH Mānoa are set by the specific graduate program. Prospective applicants should contact the graduate program(s) that they are interested in for further information.

This effort is an example of UH Mānoa’s goal of Enhancing Student Success, one of four goals identified in the 2015–25 Strategic Plan, updated in December 2020.

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New ‘sweat sticker’ improves cystic fibrosis diagnosis, accessibility https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/03/31/sticker-improves-cystic-fibrosis-diagnosis/ Wed, 31 Mar 2021 18:00:11 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138225 The device absorbs sweat and then provides a simple, accurate diagnosis within minutes.

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A team of researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and Northwestern University has developed a skin-mounted sticker for diagnosing cystic fibrosis, one of the most common life-shortening genetic disorders. The novel wearable device absorbs sweat and then provides a simple, accurate diagnosis within minutes using a color changing sensor.

Innovative technology

sticker on person's arm

The concentration of chloride in sweat is the most robust biomarker for a positive diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The current method uses a hard, rigid, wrist-strapped device. The research team—with lead author Tyler Ray, an assistant professor in UH Mānoa’s Department of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Engineering—developed the soft, flexible, skin-like “sweat sticker” in sharp contrast to the current diagnostic technology. It softly adheres to the body using a gentle, skin-safe adhesive. This results in direct contact with the skin that is both comfortable and imperceptible to the wearer. This intimate, gentle contact enables the sticker to collect 33% more sweat than the current clinical method, and the high volume ensures that one test will consistently provide a sufficient sample for an accurate diagnostic result.

The sticker also incorporates built-in colorimetric sensors that detect and measure the chloride concentration using a smartphone camera in real-time. This integrated analytical capability eliminates the need for expensive laboratory equipment and lengthy, emotionally-challenging wait times. This opens the possibility for testing in locations lacking access to certified cystic fibrosis testing facilities, as is the case for most Hawaiʻi residents.

“The use of a soft, gentle, skin-safe adhesive allows us to interface with the fragile skin of a newborn without risk of harm. The formation of a watertight seal enables collection from the skin with near perfect efficiency, removing the need for repeated testing” Ray said. “We’re very excited about the opportunity to eliminate a delay in diagnosis by analyzing sweat chloride on the device via a smartphone.”

The research team validated the sweat sticker in a clinical pilot study involving cystic fibrosis patients and health volunteers at the Cystic Fibrosis Center at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. The sticker showed enhanced performance in collected sweat volume and equivalent accuracy to current clinical diagnostic platforms.

The research and study findings were published on March 31 as the featured cover article in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Ray is the paper’s lead author and biointegrated electronics pioneer John A. Rogers is the senior author. Rogers is the Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Neurological Surgery in the McCormick School of Engineering and Feinberg School of Medicine, and the director of the Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics. Study co-author Susanna McColley, a cystic fibrosis expert and pediatric pulmonologist at Lurie Children’s Hospital and Northwestern Medicine, was the clinical lead for the pilot validation study.

The toll of cystic fibrosis

baby with sticker on arm
Healthy infant with the cystic fibrosis “sweat sticker”

Cystic fibrosis affects one out of every 3,300 births in the U.S. and a total of 70,000 people worldwide. Individuals with cystic fibrosis experience a wide range of symptoms including chronic pulmonary infection, loss of lung function and pancreatic insufficiency. Treatment plans are extremely complex, making an early diagnosis and management of its progression essential for patients.

Diagnostic challenges for cystic fibrosis

In the U.S., all newborns are screened for cystic fibrosis within the first few days of life through a heel prick. If that screen is abnormal, pediatricians order a sweat test to confirm the diagnosis. During the sweat test, the baby must wear the hard, wrist-strapped device for up to 30 minutes. Sometimes smaller and younger babies have trouble producing enough sweat for the test. Other times, the loose, ill-fitting sweat-collection device is unable to collect a large enough sample. In these instances, the baby must repeat the test at a later date, inducing anxiety and delaying treatment.

“Not only is there a risk with the current sweat testing technology to collect an insufficient volume of sweat to analyze, the analysis time itself can be lengthy for the patients—typically on the order of hours,” Ray said. “Right now, the device used in clinical tests only offers a means of collection, not analysis of the sweat chloride concentration while being worn.”

In Hawaiʻi, a majority of the state’s residents lack access to an accredited cystic fibrosis center. Diagnostic sweat chloride testing is offered by the accredited cystic fibrosis clinic at Tripler Army Medical Center; however, this testing is not available to the general public. Rather, most diagnostic cystic fibrosis testing in Hawaiʻi relies on the less specific sweat conductivity test or expensive genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene analysis requires weeks to confirm a cystic fibrosis diagnosis resulting in the possible delayed initiation of life-saving treatment.

Those who suffer from cystic fibrosis receive treatment from one of two specialists in the state. One of the specialists, Edward Fong, John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) associate clinical professor, and pediatric pulmonologist and cystic fibrosis physician for Hawaiʻi Pacific Health Medical Group, reported, “Although civilian patients receive a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in Hawaiʻi based on sweat conductivity and genetic testing, it is only considered a preliminary diagnosis. In order to be officially recognized by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation as having cystic fibrosis, families must travel to the U.S. mainland at their own expense to receive the confirmatory sweat chloride testing.”

The other specialist, Timothy Beaty, JABSOM assistant clinical professor, and pediatric pulmonologist and cystic fibrosis physician for Hawaiʻi Pacific Health Medical Group said, “Treatment success depends largely on early diagnosis. Our goal is to start therapies as early as two weeks of age in order to improve growth and prevent further organ damage. It is imperative we have a rapid, accurate and accessible test to confirm cystic fibrosis diagnosis.”

More about Ray’s research

Ray began his research developing the “sweat sticker” as a postdoctoral researcher at Northwestern University prior to joining the faculty at UH Mānoa. Ray was recruited as the first faculty hire in the College of Engineering in the field of biomedical engineering, a rapidly growing area of study that represents the nexus between engineering and health. This project exemplifies how this interdisciplinary field is of critical focus for addressing societal-level health concerns.

To help foster a closer connection with JABSOM, Ray has since joined the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence in Diabetes at JABSOM as a junior investigator. He seeks to apply this diagnostic sweat-testing platform to help promote the metabolic health of the people of Hawaiʻi and the Pacific region.

This work is an example of UH Mānoa’s goal of Excellence in Research: Advancing the Research and Creative Work Enterprise (PDF), one of four goals identified in the 2015–25 Strategic Plan (PDF), updated in December 2020.

—By Marc Arakaki

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Scientific breakthrough: First images of freshwater plumes at sea https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/03/31/first-images-of-freshwater-plumes-at-sea/ Wed, 31 Mar 2021 13:00:30 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138138 Researchers demonstrated a new method to detect freshwater plumes between the seafloor and ocean surface.

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The first imaging of substantial freshwater plumes west of Hawaiʻi Island may help water planners to optimize sustainable yields and aquifer storage calculations. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researchers demonstrated a new method to detect freshwater plumes between the seafloor and ocean surface in a study recently published in Geophysical Research Letters.

The research, supported by the Hawaiʻi EPSCoR ʻIke Wai project, is the first to demonstrate that surface-towed marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) imaging can be used to map oceanic freshwater plumes in high-resolution. It is an extension of the groundbreaking discovery of freshwater beneath the seafloor in 2020. Both are important findings in a world facing climate change, where freshwater is vital for preserving public health, agricultural yields, economic strategies, and ecosystem functions.

Profound implications

Conceptual illustration showing freshwater plumes at sea
Conceptual illustration showing freshwater plumes at sea (click/tap for larger image)

While the CSEM method has been used to detect the presence of resistive targets such as oil, gas and freshwater beneath the seafloor, this study is the first time CSEM was applied to image freshwater in the ocean water column, according to ʻIke Wai research affiliate faculty Eric Attias, who led the study.

“This study has profound implications for oceanography, hydrogeology and ocean processes that affect biogeochemical cycles in coastal waters worldwide,” said Attias. “Using CSEM, we now can estimate the volumes of freshwater emanating to the water column. This is indicative of the renewability of Hawaiʻi’s submarine freshwater system.”

Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), the leaking of groundwater from a coastal aquifer into the ocean, is a key process, providing a water source for people, and supporting sea life such as fish and algae. According to UH Mānoa Department of Earth Sciences Associate Professor and study co-author Henrietta Dulai, the location of offshore springs is extremely hard to predict because of the unknown underlying geology and groundwater conduits.

“The flux of such high volumes of nutrient-rich, low salinity groundwater to the ocean has great significance for chemical budgets and providing nutrients for offshore food webs,” said Dulai. “It is great to have a method that can pinpoint discharge locations and plumes as it opens up new opportunities to sample and identify the age of the water, its origin, chemical composition, and its significance for marine ecosystems in this otherwise oligotrophic (relatively low in plant nutrients and containing abundant oxygen in the deeper parts) ocean.”

Four Olympic swimming pools

Eric Attias deploys CSEM system
Deploying the CSEM system

This study included electromagnetic data driven 2D CSEM inversion, resistivity-to-salinity calculation, and freshwater plume volumetric estimation. Through the use of CSEM, the research team was able to image surface freshwater bodies and multiple large-scale freshwater plumes that contained up to 87% freshwater offshore Hawaiʻi Island. The results imply that at the study site substantial volumes of freshwater are present in the area between the seafloor and the ocean’s surface. A conservative estimate for one of the plumes suggests 10,720 cubic meters or approximately the volume of four Olympic-sized swimming pools.

The methodology used in this study can be applied to coastal areas worldwide, thus improving future hydrogeological models by incorporating offshore SGD and optimizing sustainable yields and storage calculations. Attias plans to extend the novel use of CSEM to further prove its application in imaging freshwater at other volcanic islands around the globe.

Attias will present his work at the International Tropical Island Water Conference taking place April 12–15, 2021. Hosted by the UH Water Resources Research Center and Hawaiʻi EPSCoR, this conference brings together water scientists, water managers and community members from around the world to share cutting-edge research and learn from each other’s experiences managing and understanding water resources across a broad range of tropical island settings.

This project is supported by the National Science Foundation EPSCoR Program Award OIA #1557349.

This work is an example of UH Mānoa’s goal of Excellence in Research: Advancing the Research and Creative Work Enterprise (PDF), one of four goals identified in the 2015–25 Strategic Plan (PDF), updated in December 2020.

—By Maria Dumanlang

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New appointees to UH Board of Regents https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/03/30/new-bor-appointees/ Wed, 31 Mar 2021 03:41:34 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138287 The University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regents has new nominees to fill upcoming vacancies.

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Board of Regent members
UH Board of Regents Wayne Higaki, Diane Paloma and William Haning, III.

Gov. David Ige announced the appointments of two new regents and the reappointment of a current regent to the University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regents (BOR) on March 30, 2021. They are: William Haning, III, Wayne Higaki and Diane Paloma.

Higaki will return to his Hawaiʻi County-West seat he has held since 2015. He has served as vice chair of the BOR this past year. He is an assistant administrator for Fund Development and Support Services at Queen’s North Hawaiʻi Community Hospital in Kamuela.

Haning is currently the director of the Addiction Psychiatry/Addiction Medicine Training programs, and deputy program director for the Psychiatric Residency Training program at UH Mānoa’s John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM). The former naval captain retired as director of undergraduate medical education for JABSOM in 2017. He takes one of the City and County of Honolulu seats.

Paloma is CEO of the King Lunalilo Trust and Home. She previously served as director of the Native Hawaiian Health Program with The Queen’s Health Systems. Paloma is a former faculty member at JABSOM. She serves on the boards of the Partners in Development Foundation, UH Foundation, the Asian-Pacific Islander American Health Forum and the Bishop Museum Association Council. Paloma will take the other Honolulu City and County seat.

All three appointees are subject to Senate confirmation. If confirmed, their terms run from July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2026.

The board formulates policy and exercises control over the university’s 10 campuses through its executive officer, the university president. The board has exclusive jurisdiction over the internal structure, management and operation of the university.

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UH Mānoa hybrid commencement celebration update https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/03/30/uh-manoa-hybrid-commencement-update/ Wed, 31 Mar 2021 03:05:39 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138271 The event includes a photo opportunity May 13–16.

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person in graduation gown holding cap with 2021

This message was shared with the students, faculty and staff of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa on March 30, 2021.

Aloha,
The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa commencement planning team, in collaboration with the campus colleges and schools, is proud to provide a hybrid commencement celebration event for spring 2021. To ensure you have the latest, most accurate information for planning purposes, we are sharing further details about the upcoming events.

Special messages from a guest speaker, student speaker and President David Lassner will be recorded and posted online the week after finals. In addition, students will have the opportunity to participate in an in-person diploma presentation and photo session (two guests allowed per student). Although we cannot offer our traditional commencement celebration, we believe the following will help students celebrate and commemorate this amazing milestone in a safe, responsible environment:

  • Students are invited to wear their cap and gown to a photo session at Bachman Hall. Commencement regalia is available through the UH Mānoa Bookstore;
  • Students’ names will be read while they receive a diploma scroll from a college/school administrator;
  • Each student will have three photos taken by the commencement photographer, which will be available for viewing and purchase via an online link emailed shortly after the event:
    • one individually with their diploma scroll;
    • one with the college/school dean;
    • and, one with their two guests;
  • PhD students will follow a slightly different protocol from the other graduates. In lieu of taking a photo with the dean, PhD students will take a photo with their advisor or a member of their committee. They will not be hooded so should arrive wearing their hood. If a committee member is not available, the student will take a photo with the dean;
  • Individual schools and colleges will be assigned a time for their photos May 13–16 (see schedule below);
  • Colleges’ and schools’ assigned times may be further broken down by department or degree. Further details regarding specific reporting times will be sent prior to the photo sessions;
  • All spring 2020, summer 2020, fall 2020, spring 2021 and summer 2021 graduates are welcome to participate;
  • All photo sessions will be recorded and available on the commencement site shortly after the close of the semester.

Registration is scheduled to open next week. The deadline to register is May 1. For further information and to register for the event, please check the commencement website.

Whether or not graduates participate in this photo session, they are still eligible to participate in any future in-person ceremonies at the Stan Sheriff Center when we are able to safely have them again.

We understand that this is not the ideal way in which you would like to celebrate your accomplishments through years of hard work and commitment. However, we do hope that this will be a special opportunity for you to enjoy this moment with loved ones.

Mahalo,
UH Mānoa Commencement Team

Photo schedule

John A. Burns School of Medicine—Thursday, May 13, 5 p.m.
William S. Richardson School of Law—Thursday, May 13, 6 p.m.
School of Architecture—Thursday, May 13, 7 p.m.
Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge—Friday, May 14, 3 p.m.
School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology—Friday, May 14, 4 p.m.
College of Social Sciences—Friday, May 14, 5 p.m.
College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources—Saturday, May 15, 9 a.m.
College of Arts and Sciences—Interdisciplinary Studies—Saturday, May 15, 11 a.m.
College of Engineering—Saturday, May 15, 1 p.m.
School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene—Saturday, May 15, 3 p.m.
College of Arts, Languages and Letters (formerly Arts and Humanities, School of Pacific and Asian Studies, and Languages, Linguistics and Literature)—Saturday, May 15, 4:30 p.m.
Shidler College of Business, including the School of Travel Industry Management—Saturday, May 15, 6 p.m.
College of Natural Sciences—Sunday, May 16, 10:30 a.m.
Thompson School of Social Work and Public Health—Sunday, May 16, 1 p.m.
College of Education (undergraduate)—Sunday, May 16, 3:30 p.m.
College of Education (advanced degrees)—Sunday, May 16, 6 p.m.

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Free program trains faculty, peers to aid anxious, depressed students https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/03/30/kognito-at-risk/ Wed, 31 Mar 2021 02:04:55 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=138261 Participants receive guidance from a virtual coach in role-play scenarios and choose how to respond to situations.

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woman at beach during sunset

Starting March 30, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Counseling and Student Development Center (CSDC) will provide UH Mānoa faculty, staff and students free access to an online program that can equip them with the knowledge and skills to recognize trauma or distress. Kognito At-Risk is a conversation simulation program which allows participants to practice challenging conversations at their own pace in a variety of virtual role-play scenarios.

Participants receive guidance from a virtual coach as they engage in role-play scenarios and choose how to respond to situations involving a distressed student or peer. The program is tailored to the UH Mānoa campus and provides users with local support services they can utilize.

“We are excited to offer Kognito, and believe it will be a great training opportunity for our students, staff and faculty to learn skills to help each other during these challenging times and beyond,” said CSDC Director Allyson Tanouye.

Experts have found significant increases in mental health concerns among university students across the nation as a result of the pandemic. As more COVID-19 restrictions are lifted, students may encounter additional stressors as they adjust to changes in remote learning, return to campus, and reconnect with others. Throughout the last year, the CSDC has received requests from faculty and staff on how to help students that show signs of anxiety or depression.

Separate modules in the program are available for students, faculty and staff. At-Risk for Students allows students to practice conversations with a simulated friend in distress and develop a self-care plan, while At-Risk for Faculty and Staff allows faculty or staff members to practice conversations with simulated students in various levels of distress while occupying the role of a professor.

Kognito is a well-researched program, and data indicates its effectiveness for increasing support and referrals for students in university settings, particularly for those who might be at risk for experiencing excessive stress. The online program is available through CARES Act funding allocated to the CSDC. Upon completion, participants can request a follow-up workshop from the CSDC to debrief and address questions.

To access the Kognito simulation:

  1. Go to https://kognitocampus.com/
  2. Create a new account
  3. Use enrollment key: manoaemployee (if faculty/staff) or manoastudent (if student)
  4. Follow the on-screen instructions
  5. Choose your simulation and click “LAUNCH”

For more information go to the CSDC website.

More resources:

This is an example of UH Mānoa’s goal of Enhancing Student Success, one of four goals identified in the 2015–25 Strategic Plan, updated in December 2020.

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