University of Hawaiʻi System News https://www.hawaii.edu/news News from the University of Hawaii Thu, 15 Oct 2020 00:01:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-UHNews512-1-32x32.jpg University of Hawaiʻi System News https://www.hawaii.edu/news 32 32 Virtual talk to target post-COVID-19 economic approach https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/14/virtual-post-covid-19-economic-talk/ Thu, 15 Oct 2020 00:01:39 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128732 Topics to be discussed during the conversation include the future of cities, public investment and economic diversification, and the challenges and opportunities posed by climate change.

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Honolulu

COVID-19 has provoked the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression and experts are busy formulating strategies to navigate the recession and lay groundwork for growth and resilience. On October 21 at 8 a.m., the University of Hawaiʻi Better Tomorrow Speaker Series, UH Economic Research Organization (UHERO), Hawaiʻi Community Foundation and Kamehameha Schools will present a virtual discussion, “Recovery to Resilience: Steps Toward the Post-COVID Economy.”

Edward Glaeser
Edward Glaeser

Harvard economist Edward Glaeser will lead the conversation set to include topics such as the future of cities, public investment and economic diversification, and the challenges and opportunities posed by climate change.

Glaeser is a specialist in cities, ideas transmission and determinants of economic growth and authored books Triumph of the City and After the Flood. Other featured speakers in the virtual event include UHERO research fellows Makena Coffman, professor of urban and regional planning, and Sumner La Croix, professor emeritus of economics.

“Ed Glaeser’s research on American cities and global economic crises provides far-reaching and unexpected insights into the American economy and provides important clues on how the U.S. and Hawaiʻi economies will change in response to the COVID-19 crisis,” said La Croix.

Register on Zoom and submit questions in advance.

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Former UH Hilo ‘Wonder Woman’ now real life superhero https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/14/uh-hilo-wonder-woman/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 21:24:17 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128727 Alumna Meghan Langbehn took on two sports and a nursing degree at UH Hilo before serving on the frontlines as a nurse in Seattle.

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Meghan Langbehn
Meghan Langbehn

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Athletics’ former “Wonder Woman” has transformed into a real life superhero as she transitioned from a UH Hilo nursing student to a registered nurse at the Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, Washington.

Alumna Meghan Langbehn earned the nickname for participating in women’s soccer, running cross country and studying in the UH Hilo nursing program—all in the same semester.

“Everyone thought I was crazy,” Langbehn said. “No one had attempted that before, and for good reason.”

During a typical week as a junior in the fall of 2017, Langbehn would run with her cross country team in the morning, go to classes, practice with her soccer team in the morning or afternoon and then hit the books again until very late at night. On Saturdays, the routine was even more hectic. She would have a race in the morning, and if geography allowed, would take the field with her soccer teammates as a defender in the afternoon.

Langbehn started in a total of 37 career matches on the soccer field before an injury ended her season as a junior. In 2017 and 2018, she was one of the top runners on the cross country team, often the second or third Vulcan to cross the finish line.

As stressful as life sometimes was as a student-athlete, Langbehn’s new world carries a greater responsibility.

“I am working in a career in which human life is in my hands and the practice is always evolving,” Langbehn said. “I am going to be learning for the rest of my life, but that’s ultimately who I am and [what] motivates me.”

For the former “Wonder Woman,” life today is different than it was just a few short years ago.

“I miss being involved in the Hilo community and being able to participate in all my passions at once,” Langbehn said. “I miss the competitive lifestyle of pushing myself each day and inspiring others. I miss the challenge of the astounding time management it all required. I don’t always feel like I was giving any of the three all that I could, but the balancing act was a very valuable education. I wouldn’t trade that time for anything.”

Read the full story at the UH Hilo Athletics website.

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Mothers with postpartum depression experience shared themes https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/14/postpartum-depression-themes/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 18:00:39 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128650 The results will help bring awareness to postpartum depression not only being a mental health issue, but also a public health concern.

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mother with her baby
(Photo credit: iStock Photo)

Researchers hope that suicidal thoughts in mothers with postpartum depression is elevated as not only a mental health issue, but also as a public health concern following a recent study published in Social Work in Mental Health.

Suicidality was investigated in a study conducted by Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work faculty December Maxwell at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and Regina Praetorius at the University of Texas at Arlington.

“This study illuminates the importance of social workers focusing on the unique ways mothers can experience suicidality in the postpartum period,” said Maxwell.

Data were collected through qualitative interpretive meta-synthesis (QIMS), which is a social-work specific method developed to synthesize qualitative research with the added aim of utilizing multiple researchers to create new thematic content from across literature.

The data revealed that there were six primary shared themes amongst the mothers who were experiencing postpartum depression and suicidality. The six themes were:

  1. I wear a happy mask
  2. Motherhood is not as it seems
  3. Losing control
  4. Sinking ship
  5. Sleep makes it worse
  6. Sharing stories and chores

A further theoretical reduction resulted in the alignment of the existing Interpersonal Theory of Suicide to postpartum depression-specific suicidality.

Although much quantitative research has evaluated risk factors of suicidality for those experiencing postpartum depression, less is known about their lived experiences. Such knowledge is imperative for social work professionals to have a better understanding of their role in postpartum depression intervention. Identifying prevention and intervention points should be further explored across fields serving women with postpartum depression and their families.

If any of the six themes sound familiar to you or a loved one, please contact or share the Crisis Line of Hawaiʻi at (800) 753-6879 or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at (800) 273-8255.

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Pioneering wireless technology ALOHAnet honored as engineering milestone https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/13/alohanet-honored-as-engineering-milestone/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 03:08:44 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128710 ALOHAnet was recognized as an IEEE milestone.

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The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa College of Engineering was the birthplace of a revolutionary wireless communication technology nearly 50 years ago, and the project that started it, ALOHAnet, has received a major international engineering honor.

On October 13, ALOHAnet was recognized by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as an IEEE milestone—after a lengthy application and selection process—in a dedication ceremony at UH Mānoa’s Holmes Hall.

people standing next to a satellite with Diamond Head in the background
ALOHAnet satellite dish on the roof of Holmes Hall with some of its founders (Photo courtesy: Ram Chandran)

ALOHAnet and the ALOHA protocols all developed right here have changed the world as one of the critical enabling technologies for the internet before it was called the internet,” UH President David Lassner said.

“It’s been unbelievable for me to be able to say that I have the opportunity to work at a place that can arguably be said to have given birth to our modern way of life, a lifestyle that is inextricably intertwined with the internet, cell phones, wifi and all other mobile technologies out there,” College of Engineering Dean Brennon Morioka said.

Governor David Ige, a UH Mānoa electrical engineering alumnus, said ALOHAnet is an example of how UH has shaped the future of Hawaiʻi.

“Clearly what ALOHAnet means to the internet and wireless communications is just another inspiration for all of us as we look forward to what the future will be,” Ige said.

ALOHAnet beginnings

headshot of Norman Abramson
Norman Abramson

All wireless communications today—including mobile, satellite, cellular and WiFi—utilize the protocol developed in the ALOHAnet system to establish an initial link. Debuted in 1971, ALOHAnet was the first system to transmit data into a computer using radio waves. ALOHAnet led to the development of Ethernet and personal wireless communication technologies.

Norman Abramson, one of the ALOHAnet founders, came to the UH Mānoa College of Engineering as a faculty member in 1968, just three years before ALOHAnet was launched. Abramson served as a professor of electrical engineering and chair of the Information and Computer Sciences Department until 1996. He then continued his work in education and the private sector.

Franklin Kuo was also a faculty member in the College of Engineering and spearheaded the ALOHAnet project with Abramson. Kuo credited other faculty members and graduate students who also worked to develop ALOHAnet. Kuo left UH Mānoa in 1975 for a career at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. where he worked as the director of information systems.

“Whenever you pick up your telephone and make a phone call or use some other applications from that telephone, the very first thing you do is a packet comes from that telephone and the packet says ‘ALOHA,’” Abramson said. “I had the feeling back then that the ALOHA channel and the technology that we came up with would be used, but I had no idea it would be used so widely.”

Reaction to ALOHAnet milestone

The University of Hawaiʻi is the gift that keeps on giving, and it has been giving for 50 years and more,
—Vint Cerf

Google’s chief internet evangelist and “Father of the Internet,” Vint Cerf, commended Abramson and Kuo for triggering an extraordinary explosion of technology.

“The University of Hawaiʻi is the gift that keeps on giving, and it has been giving for 50 years and more,” Cerf said. “We benefit from that. Imagine the industries that have grown up around people who have learned skills from the University of Hawaiʻi.”

Charlie Bass was a UH Mānoa graduate student from 1968 to 1972. After earning his PhD in electrical engineering in 1972, Bass went on to have a career in education and the private sector. Bass expressed his deep gratitude for the groundwork laid by Abramson and Kuo in the classroom, and shared a lighthearted moment that he and Abramson had when Bass first arrived at UH Mānoa in 1968.

“I walked into Norm’s office, who was my primary contact at the time, and I laid out what I wanted to do and he listened and waited for a minute and said ‘you know, maybe you should leave time for surfing,’” Bass said. “I nearly fell over. The last thing I ever expected someone at the university to do was think about my leisure time or my mental health. It was a good start.”

—By Marc Arakaki

ALOHAnet dedication video by the College of Engineering

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UH Mānoa student loan defaults among lowest in the nation https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/13/low-student-debt-ranking/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 01:23:57 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128691 The flagship campus of the UH System is ranked 766 out of 5,677 public, private and for profit educational institutions.

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Students on McCarthy Mall

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa continues to be among the nation’s best when it comes to student loan defaults, according to LendEDU, a private company that tracks U.S. Department of Education student loan data. The flagship campus in the 10-campus UH System is ranked 766 out of 6,060 public, private and for profit educational institutions. UH Mānoa’s default rate was 3.3% compared to 9.7% nationally.

The rankings were part of the LendEDU’s second annual report released this week. According to LendEDU, UH Mānoa’s low loan default rate is recognized for creating an environment where the burden of student loan debt repayment is much less compared to almost every other campus in the country.

The state of Hawaiʻi is ranked 6th out of 50 states in the rate of student loan defaults.

View the full report.

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New picture book makes math fun for keiki https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/13/book-makes-math-fun/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 00:55:48 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128668 Who Has More? The Great Flood introduces children to a curious little girl, Lani, and her best friend, Rabbert.

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math book image
Lani and Rabbert

A new book that shares the delight to be found in mathematics exploration with children was written by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa College of Education Curriculum Research & Development Group (CRDG) mathematics faculty members.

Who Has More? The Great Flood introduces children to a curious little girl, Lani, and her best
friend, Rabbert. Children join Lani and Rabbert as they observe, explore and experiment with the concept of volume through practical daily living activities. Along the way, they become aware of the everyday math around them. The title reflects the mathematical concept found in the story in a way that is accessible to young keiki.

math book cover

CRDG Associate Specialist Seanyelle Yagi, Associate Professor Linda Venenciano and retired Junior Specialist Fay Zenigami created the book as a means for expanding their work from the Measure Up mathematics research and development project at CRDG. The book is illustrated by CRDG Senior Learning Technology Digital Arts Designer Byron Inouye.

In their development of the Measure Up project, the authors discovered that incorporating stories into mathematics lessons brought joy to first grade students and built upon their imagination and creativity.

“Stories presented a highly engaging situation through which students could investigate complex and challenging mathematics concepts,” said the authors. “Our observations of the students in the classroom inspired us to write the Lani and Rabbert, Math Explorers storybook.”

Who Has More? The Great Flood is the first title in the Lani and Rabbert Math Explorers series. The book and the free online activities that accompany it provide an educational resource for parents, caregivers and educators who want to start introducing their kids to mathematical ways of thinking. Hardcover and ebook versions are available for purchase.

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Med school sim center earns worldʻs 1st accreditation https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/13/simtiki-worlds-1st-accreditation/ Tue, 13 Oct 2020 23:53:31 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128662 SimTiki was accredited for its fellowship program by the Society of Simulation in Healthcare.

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control room overseeing students
The SimTiki Simulation Center at JABSOM.

The John A. Burns School of Medicine’s (JABSOM) SimTiki Simulation Center at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa made history in September 2020 by becoming the first simulation center in the world to earn fellowship program accreditation by the Society of Simulation in Healthcare.

“Fellowship accreditation is a distinction for our education programs, reflecting contributions of the entire team, especially the fellows who believed in the quality of our program and worked hard so we could achieve this recognition,” said Benjamin Berg, director of the SimTiki Simulation Center.

Opened in 2006, SimTiki (“Tiki” derives from the Polynesian term for “human”) is JABSOM’s simulation-based healthcare education center and facilitates more than 3,000 training encounters annually. It serves as a community resource for broad training needs ranging from high school students and medical students/residents to health professionals and military personnel, as well as its international programs, including in-residence research scholar positions and programs focused on faculty development and clinical skills.

SimTiki made headlines in 2015 as one of the first 10 centers in the nation accredited by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare for the fields of teaching/education and research. In 2019, SimTiki achieved additional accreditation in the area of assessment.

The road to simulation fellowship accreditation began in 2007, which involved the submission of extensive documentation and a panel site visit with interviews of the lab directors and staff, learners, educators and JABSOM organizational leadership.

Since then, SimTiki has trained 28 international fellows. Graduates include physicians and nurses from Japan, Thailand and South Korea, who spend one to two years in a post-graduate program focused on the development of educator skills. Fellows participate in educational research, teaching, curriculum development, and often complete the JABSOM Office of Medical Education fellowship in medical education.

Read more on the JABSOM website.

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Learn about careers in intelligence at free virtual job fair https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/13/careers-in-intelligence-free-virtual-job-fair/ Tue, 13 Oct 2020 20:51:11 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128616 The virtual job fair will be on Friday, October 16, 9 a.m.–noon.

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person sitting at a computer

Interested in a booming career in the intelligence community? Students and alumni from University of Hawaiʻi’s 10 campuses are invited to the Careers in Intelligence virtual job fair on Friday, October 16, 9 a.m.–noon.

The intelligence community is comprised of federal, state and local government agencies, and private industry professionals. Participating organizations include: NSA (National Security Agency), DIA (Defense Intelligence Agency), FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation), Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific, Booz Allen Hamilton and Hawaiian Electric.

The job fair will be hosted on Brazen, an online platform that allows job seekers to view videos from recruiters and hiring managers, and discuss in real time with recruiters about their various employment opportunities.

For more information and details on how to register, visit the Careers in Intelligence virtual job fair website.

“This is a unique event for our students and alumni to interface with employers representing federal, state and private employers who are looking for top talent to fill current and future critical roles in cybersecurity,” said UH Chief Information Security Officer Jodi Ito.

The Careers in Intelligence virtual job fair is sponsored by UH, CyberHawaii and the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command.

“It is always productive and impactful working with Jodi Ito, our chief information security officer, CyberHawaii and the United States Indo-Pacific Command to bring about unique cybersecurity innovation, education and workforce development opportunities for our community,” said UH Office of Innovation and Commercialization Interim Director Steve Auerbach. “If your passion is science, technology, engineering, innovation, business, history, economics, mathematics, foreign language, architecture, human resources, communications and you enjoy solving tough problems and you are interested in a career with the intelligence community, then check out the Careers in Intelligence career fair.”

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Hurricanes, heavy rain critical for Oʻahu’s groundwater supply https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/13/rain-critical-oahu-groundwater/ Tue, 13 Oct 2020 20:38:59 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128635 Research indicates that rain brought by hurricanes and Kona storms can often be the most important precipitation for re-supplying groundwater.

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student preparing rainfall collection
Daniel Dores, preparing rainfall collection equipment, West Oʻahu. (Photo credit: Michael Mathioudakis)

Located within the most isolated archipelago in the world, Hawaiʻi is critically dependent on a clean, ample supply of fresh water. New research led by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa scientists indicates that rain brought to the islands by hurricanes and Kona storms can often be the most important precipitation for re-supplying groundwater in many regions of Oʻahu.

“The majority of Hawaiʻi’s freshwater comes from groundwater,” said Daniel Dores, lead author and groundwater and geothermal researcher in the UH Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST). “In this study, we investigated the relationship between trade wind showers, major rainfall events like Kona storms, and groundwater.”

Dores and a team of scientists from SOEST and the Hawaiʻi Department of Health collected rainfall around Oʻahu and analyzed the stable isotopes of rainwater, chemical signatures in the water molecules. They compared the chemical signatures in rainwater to those of groundwater to determine the source of water in the aquifers—event-based rainfall or trade wind-related rain.

“Because windward and mauka showers are so common, it is easy to assume that is the main source of our drinking water,” said Dores. “Also, large rainfall events such as Kona storms result in significant runoff into the oceans. However, our research found that a lot of the rain from Kona storms makes it into our groundwater aquifers and is an important source of our drinking water.”

Hawaiʻi is experiencing substantial changes in trade wind weather patterns, and precipitation events could become more extreme. Co-authors will continue researching to understand more about local and regional groundwater recharge and water quality.

“By better understanding how our groundwater is impacted by these extreme precipitation events, we can better protect the resource itself,” said Dores.

illustration of Oahu groundwater
Illustration showing sources for groundwater. (Photo credit: Dores et al., 2020)

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Cultural webinar series launched to uplift during pandemic https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/10/13/cultural-webinar-series-to-uplift-during-pandemic/ Tue, 13 Oct 2020 19:40:33 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=128609 To help foster Indigenous well-being, Hawaiʻi Papa O Ke Ao unveiled a cultural webinar series showcasing music, dance and storytelling hosted by sources from across UH’s 10 campuses.

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Research has shown that Indigenous peoples are often disproportionately affected by epidemics and other crises compared to Hawaiʻi non-Indigenous counterparts. During the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns for the health and well-being of Native Hawaiian students, faculty and staff at the University of Hawaiʻi struck a chord with UH presidential appointed Indigenous education work committee Hawaiʻi Papa O Ke Ao (HPOKA).

“Committee members shared that folks on their campus were feeling isolated, disconnected and depressed due to the psycho-social, emotional and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said UH West Oʻahu Chancellor Maenette Benham during a HPOKA video address.

To help foster Indigenous well-being, HPOKA and the UH Office of the President unveiled a cultural webinar series showcasing music, dance and storytelling. He Ukana Aloha Kā Kīlauea is a free bi-monthly, yearlong series hosted by sources from across UH’s 10 campuses. Hawaiʻi Community College will be featured on the series on October 14 and 28. Hawaiʻi CC Professor Taupōuri Tangarō will lead a presentation on hula noho (hula danced in a seated or kneeling position). Tangarō, a HPOKA committee member, first proposed the idea of a storytelling series to the work committee as a form of nourishment to the Native Hawaiian community during this challenging time ushered in by the pandemic. Each campus will have the opportunity to present through June 2021.

Taupouri Tangaro
Taupōuri Tangarō
  • November 4 and 25 (UH Mānoa)
  • December 9 and 23 (UH West Oʻahu)
  • January 13 and 27 (Kauaʻi CC )
  • February 10 and 24 (UH Hilo)
  • March 10 and 24 (Honolulu CC )
  • April 14 and 28 (Windward CC )
  • May 12 and 26 (Kapiʻolani CC )
  • June 9 and 23 (Leeward CC )

In September, presentations from UH Maui College kicked off the series which featured traditional tales about Haʻehaʻekū, a giant believed to have resided in the valley of Waikolu on Molokaʻi. The story spotlights how the giant cared for ʻuala or sweet potato and calls attention to an important lesson about why it’s important to think of others. During the segment, viewers also learned how to make Hawaiian dessert kōʻelepālau using the starchy vegetable.

In January 2012, HPOKA set goals and objectives to address the higher education needs of Native Hawaiians through three pathways; leadership development, community engagement and Hawaiian language and cultural parity.

For more information, go to the He Ukana Aloha Kā Kīlauea website.

Hula noho
An ʻōlapa (dancer) performs a hula noho or seated hula.

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